Blog

C Parmenter | 16 November, 2017
A lot of AFM nanomechanical measurements are geared towards measuring modulus.  But what is modulus? There are so many different kinds:  Youngs modulus, elastic modulus, tensile...
Anonymous (not verified) | 16 November, 2017
It’s time for the annual fall meeting of MRS, which always takes place in Boston at the Hynes Convention Center and adjacent Sheraton Hotel the week after Thanksgiving (November...
C Parmenter | 08 October, 2017
Calibrations are an important parameter for all metrological instrumentation and measurements.  You need to have confidence in what you are measuring whether it’s the x and y...
C Parmenter | 18 September, 2017
The jargon in the scanning probe world has become really confusing, especially as it is condensed mostly into 3-4 letter acronyms, where the final letter is usually “m” for...
C Parmenter | 18 September, 2017
As summer draws to a close, the fall conference season swings into action.  A lot of people have asked me over the years, “what are the good AFM conferences”?  Either to learn...
C Parmenter | 30 August, 2017
It still amazes me to hear how many AFM users are still missing many of the basics of AFM operation.  I interact heavily with users from a wide variety of backgrounds at...
C Parmenter | 17 July, 2017
That seems to be a weighty question, especially for an SPM blog.  It is on my mind as I returned from the 2017 Techconnect meeting which was held at the Gaylord convention center...
C Parmenter | 17 July, 2017
I attended the spring ACS meeting in San Francisco in April.  ACS is always chock-full of things to do between the technical program and exhibit.  This year, the spring meeting...
C Parmenter | 11 June, 2017
Ever since his 2009 Science publication, Leo Gross and his IBM Zurich colleagues have captured our imagination by imaging the pentacene molecule with AFM and revealing clearly its...
C Parmenter | 19 May, 2017
I started this blog by calling it “AFM vs. instrumented nanoindenters.”  But I really didn’t like that title because I don’t like to pit these 2 methods against one another and I...
C Parmenter | 03 May, 2017
I haven’t written much about nanoindentation yet.  The field itself is pretty confusing because of a lot of ‘AFMers’ who conduct force spectroscopy measurements call these...
C Parmenter | 26 April, 2017
Hybrid or correlative microscopy methods are in vogue.  My last blog was about joining the complementary worlds of AFM and SEM, and I mentioned some other hybrid AFM methods...
C Parmenter | 10 April, 2017
I have recently been hearing a lot about hybrid AFM-SEMs which are a fairly recent innovation with some commercial entries to market over the past 5 years.  So first, let’s...
C Parmenter | 06 February, 2017
 
C Parmenter | 02 February, 2017
The Materials Research Society (MRS) annual fall meeting in Boston was again a powerful showcase of technological capability and innovation in materials science with over 6,000...
C Parmenter | 17 January, 2017
In this week’s blog I am concluding my little two-part series about the cantilever. Why so much space and effort dedicated to the SPM cantilever?  Because too often I encounter...
C Parmenter | 08 December, 2016
The heart of the AFM is really in the cantilever/tip assembly, often referred to as the probe.  This probe governs the interaction and ultimately the type and quality of data...
C Parmenter | 04 October, 2016
User-friendliness seems to be a key feature in operating any high end instrumentation these days, including electron or scanning probe microscopes.   Whenever you check out a...
C Parmenter | 01 September, 2016
Atomic force microscopy is celebrating its 30th birthday this year after its invention in 1986 by Gerd Binnig, Christoph Gerber, and Calvin Quate, who were scientists at the IBM...
C Parmenter | 31 July, 2015
With just a few days to go before M&M 2015 I thought that I’d give you a run-down of what you can expect from the conference and also its host city of Portland. No doubt as...
J Heath | 28 April, 2014
The business end of an atomic force microscope is the tip, the extremely sharp probe that interacts with the sample and produces the wide variety of physical and chemical...
J Heath | 24 July, 2013
In 1884, Edwin Abbott wrote “Flatland – A Romance of Many Dimensions”, a mathematical fiction in which he described a whimsical world of only two dimensions. The protagonist of...
J Heath | 23 July, 2013
The scanning probe microscope is probably the most versatile of all microscopes. There is scarcely a physical property of matter that cannot be investigated with scanning...
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